Silver Decorations in LabVIEW 2014

Aug 13th, 2014 by Christina in LabVIEW

In LabVIEW 2014, we’ve added a Decorations palette to the Silver category. It contains some shapes that we believe work well with Silver controls.

The palette looks like this:

SilverDecorations2014[Note: You may notice I have the Silver category configured as my top category. You can change visible categories by clicking the Customize button and selecting Change Visible Palettes. You can reorder the categories by dragging the handle to the left of the category name].

This palette contains four of the previously-unpublished decorations that we added to LabVIEW 2011 (which you can see in New 2011 Decorations.vi).

Some of the Silver decorations look different on Windows than they do on Mac/Linux, specifically with the gradients, drop shadows, and anti-aliased circles.

Windows_SilverDecorations

Silver Decorations Mac

I also added a new decoration to 2014 which didn’t make it to the palettes. It’s a rectangle with very slightly rounded corners. The advantage of using this decoration over using a similar bitmap image is that this decoration can be resized and colored.

UnpublishedDecoration2014Download the Unpublished 2014 Decoration VI here.

Feel free to use it in VIs, but note that if you save it for versions earlier than LabVIEW 2014, it will change into a regular rectangle.

3 Comments

  • Alright Christina, this is just sort of like throwing red meat in the lions cage….

    The Mac folks have a question….

    The “rounded box” and the and “Silver Circle” are missing the drop shadows on the Mac. However drop shadows are common on almost all Mac graphics packages and might even be built into the Cocoa graphics primitives.

    So how come NI can’t build a decent graphic icon on the Mac platform? Not sure what graphics format these primitives are saved in, but what is the reason for the platform difference?

    • Without Cocoa, these drawing routines are very difficult. We can do them in 64-bit Mac fairly easily, but I was hesitant to make 32-bit and 64-bit inconsistent.

      • Maybe, I am not sure I have used a non-cocoa graphics program in a long time. I do recall a lot of drop shadow use on some of the earliest Mac OS X platforms though.

        There are inconsistencies between 32 bit and 64 bit Mac now (mostly with paths). It is that the 64 bit Mac will either be inconsistent with the 32 bit Mac or inconsistent with the Windows (and linux?) systems. As long as there is an inconsistency between the 32 bit Mac and the Windows then then the 64 bit Mac will have to be inconsistent with one and agree with another.

        Actually this is related to my area of research. On a triangular lattice magnets want to anti-align but geometrically they can’t align with both of their neighbors who are anti-aligned! It is called geometrical frustration. It gets really odd when you allow quantum mechanics to step in!

 

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